An Editor’s Thoughts on the Peer Review Process

The Political Methodologist

[Ed. note: This post is contributed by Sara McLaughlin Mitchell, Professor and Chair of the Department of Political Science at the University of Iowa.]

As academics, the peer review process can be one of the most rewarding and frustrating experiences in our careers. Detailed and careful reviews of our work can significantly improve the quality of our published research and identify new avenues for future research. Negative reviews of our work, while also helpful in terms of identifying weaknesses in our research, can be devastating to our egos and our mental health. My perspectives on peer review have been shaped by twenty years of experience submitting my work to journals and book publishers and by serving as an Associate Editor for two journals, Foreign Policy Analysis and Research & Politics. In this piece, I will 1) discuss the qualities of good reviews, 2) provide advice for how to…

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About protohedgehog

Palaeontologist, just completed a PhD at Imperial College environmental drivers of biodiversity and extinction through geological time. Passionate about science communication and opening up the research process. Tweets vigorously as @protohedgehog. Freelance science writer and consultant, and author of kids book Excavate Dinosaurs.

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