Help us, we’re poor

Straight to it. Myself and Bastian Greshake have been invited to OpenCon this year. Sadly though, we were not awarded travel grants. Super sadly, we’re both poor too.

200_s

As such, we’ve launched a crowdfunding campaign on IndieGogo to help us get to Washington DC. All the details are on the page, including a video with some out-takes.. We’re nerds, not crowdfunders.

I’ve written extensively about how amazing OpenCon is before, for PeerJ, and personally for 2014 and 2015. I’ve also led a satellite event in Berlin, and am planning on leading another satellite this year too that will be even bigger and better! You can see my application here too.

If you can support us by reading, sharing, or contributing, we would both be eternally thankful.

 

Every time you publish behind a paywall, a kitten dies.

This was originally posted at: http://blogs.egu.eu/palaeoblog/?p=1194

“Every day, people are denied access to something they have a right to.”

That’s the opening line from a new appeal from students Joe McArthur and David Carroll. Open Access describes a form of publication of research where articles are made instantly available for free, and with unlimited reusability rights, as long as the source is attributed. There are many pseudo-open access ‘definitions’ out there from publishers to obfuscate its use, but this is the only real, least restrictive one.

There has been a global open access movement over the last 10-15 years, which has accelerated so rapidly in the last year or two that many research funders and institutions, as well as government bodies, have developed open access policies. However, despite this progress, large commercial publishers like Wiley, Taylor and Francis, and Elsevier are still the most profitable industry in the world (with margins even higher than Apple), the majority of their profits coming from obscene charges for pdfs and library subscriptions for research articles and journals.

Continue reading